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RE: Do we still need to build models beyond the Standard Model of particle physics ?

in StemSocial2 months ago

Maybe looking at the work of Jean Pierre Petit and his Cosmological model Janus, may be a way for developing a new model.

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Thanks for the suggestion. I am however afraid that the answer is "probably not".

The reason is that I focus on particle physics whereas the model of Petit focuses on cosmology. The goals of the two are different (microscopic world versus our universe). In the context of the standard model of cosmology, there is dark matter, so that there is a way to relate particle physics and cosmology by introducing the concept of a dark matter particle. In the model of Petit, there is no dark matter, so that the two stay disconnected. In this sense, the model of Petit won't help us to go beyond the Standard Model of particle physics.

As a side note, I have noticed that the model of Petit (which I didn't know) has not been well received by cosmologists. The reason seems that since its proposal in the end of the 1970s, there are still no predictions that are unique to his model, and no evidence supporting it. I however have not studied this more, but this thread is interesting, on that topic.

  • As to the usage of Janus model for particle physics I must admit I have no clue, but I though that his model bring a new way of seeing matter so it maybe of some usage.

  • As to the reception of Petit model, he mainly have a bad reputation, because of his unconventional views on ufo phenomenon. But from what I understand, the math behind are solid, and his model evolved since 1970.

  • You can watch his video from 2020 where he sum's up his model. (at 1h30 he start describing how the model fits to observation so far and make one prediction about lab dark matter that will fall down)

As to the usage of Janus model for particle physics I must admit I have no clue, but I though that his model bring a new way of seeing matter so it maybe of some usage.

It really depends on the goal pursued. Here, in terms of particle physics, the intersection is just empty, so that the model cannot bring any insight (except maybe if you push for a no-dark-matter option, which is not only specific to this model by the way).

We must in fact keep it mind that matter at the elementary particle level is not governed by the same laws as at the macroscopic level. We are dealing with different energy (or scale) regimes.

As to the reception of Petit model, he mainly have a bad reputation, because of his unconventional views on ufo phenomenon. But from what I understand, the math behind are solid, and his model evolved since 1970.

I have indeed noticed this, which is a part of the information I found I completely skipped (for me, UFOs are a "no thanks").

ou can watch his video from 2020 where he sum's up his model. (at 1h30 he start describing how the model fits to observation so far and make one prediction about lab dark matter that will fall down)

Sorry but that is way too long for the time I have (people on chain tried to have me watching 20 minutes videos without success ;) ). I am very happy to read anything (or to add it to my to-read list), but not to watch.

What I meant is that other models of cosmology can explain many observations made in the universe (structure formation, cosmic microwave background, etc., to quote a few). In contrast, from what I see the model of Petit is not as good. This is maybe (I am not sure as this is quite far from what I work on) the reason why most cosmologists just dismissed it. If someone proposes a new model, the new model must do at least as good as what anything else on the market does.