Do you have any questions about nuclear energy? Upvotes for great questions!

in #stem3 years ago (edited)

Nuclear power is a way to produce energy without combustion, using a controlled nuclear reaction to produce heat. The heat is converted to energy. The nuclear power plants in use are fission reactors, in which the energy is released in a reaction in which the atoms split and release energy.

As nothing is burning in the nuclear reaction, like when using wood, oil or coal, there are no carbon emissions in the energy production itself. This is why nuclear energy is considered as a low emission energy source.


Hopefully I had the facts correct enough above, as I know this stuff better in Finnish than in English.

I'm a big fan of nuclear energy, but I've noticed not all people share the interest in nuclear power. Most of us don't know very much about nuclear energy and there's a lot of misinformation being spread on different aspects of nuclear power.

If you have any questions regarding nuclear energy, please ask in comments.

I can't promise to answer all the questions, but I'll try to gather answers to the questions and make a post about nuclear energy. Otherwise I'll just have to come up with questions on myself, but that's a quite limited approach.

I'll upvote good questions. Don't expect to be rich, but you'll earn some Steem and STEM-tokens.

But be bold and ask things about nuclear energy production, nuclear power plants, nuclear waste etc.

Other questions related to energy production are appreciated too.

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Image by Gerd Altmann from Pixabay


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Nuclear energy is IMO the only way to reduce our carbon emission and maintaining at the same time our way of living. However, nuclear waste is a clearly identified issue. If only governments could put more money both in the associated research and in the development of alternatives (I find it not enough funded by a large factor)...

It seems to me that if nuclear fission were not a big part of generating carbon free power, then it would be impossible to decrease carbon dioxide emissions sufficiently and fast enough to mitigate global warming while not causing a serious energy shortage. This is a hotly debated issue but where do you stand in this?

do you think one day we will have fully nuclear powered cars?

Don't you think that if we continue using nuclear energy, there will be more pollution due to nuclear waste?

Considering the contamination and pollution and subsequent damage fossil fuels does to our bodies through the air, water and food chains, is nuclear safer?

Historically, yes.

Posted using Partiko iOS

Is fusion reactor a thing? To what I've understood it is pretty much sci-fi at this point, but let's say it was a thing: How would it be different from fission and it's usage in real world?

Second question: Is there any way to make the leftover radioactive waste from the nuclear reaction non-radioactive?

what are the newest cleaning methods to try and deal with the waste?

Do you think it is wise to build nuclear reactors on fault lines? e.g. Should Japan be running Nuclear or switching to alternative energy like wave?

 3 years ago 

Why is the half-life of neutrons around 10 minutes even though they do not decay in the nucleus of an atom?

This I can answer :)

This is the half-life of a free neutron (it is actually closer to 15 minutes than 10 minutes). Inside a nucleus, neutrons are by far not free and are stable thanks the the presence of the other protons and neutrons.

PS: I will try to check the movie later on tonight or tomorrow. This is still on the to-do list ;)

Is nucular a word?


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