Dr. Jane Ruby: COVID19 Vaccines DO Contain Magnetic Components | Magnetofection

in COVID-195 months ago (edited)

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Stew Peter interviews Dr. Jane Ruby, a seasoned medical professional on what she says is now the proven presence of magnetic components in at least 2 of the COVID19 'vaccines'.
The many videos that have appeared on social media appearing to show metalic objects sticking to people after having received a COVID19 jab have been ridiculed and rejected by many people.
Dr. Ruby states that 'magnetofection' is being used in these vaccines to concentrate RNA into the body's cells. This may well be what is causing magnetic effects to be seen on recipients of the technology.
Dr. Ruby also highlights an example of a company that sells magnetic products designed to do exactly what she is saying the covid vaccines are doing and says that this company IS being used by at least 2 of the vaccine manufacturers.
Link to Chemicell Website.

Dr. Jane Ruby
http://drjaneruby.com
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/dr-jane-ruby-49971411/

Stew Peters
http://StewPeters.tv


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The first time I heard about vaccines being magnetic was from some of our friends who recently got vaccinated and showed us some of their photos with spoons hanging from their shoulders shortly after they got the vaccine. They are obviously very pro-vaccination and had no reason to tell us a fabricated story whatsoever. After that I searched for that online and found tons of mainstream articles ridiculing that. Now I am left wondering, why our pro-vaccine friends should lie to is about that.

Aloha! I've seen various videos (which I now cannot locate) which show items literally jumping out of the person's hand and getting attached to their arm. I can't see that happening without a magnetic attraction or CGI. At which point I have to think that magnetism is more likely than CGI. Given the number of people having the shots, we should see good video collections of large numbers of people demonstrating this if it is legit - I've seen a few already.

So, she says these magnetic agents are in the vaccines. What is her source?

She appears to be the source. From her words, she seems a little evasive when it comes to proof and the publicly shared evidence appears to be 'the magnetic tech exists and could have been used'. Maybe someone will press her for substance.

But that's the thing, nobody says the magnetic tech does not exist, it's been developed for several years now, and the info is public with several published papers. One of the main ideas is to use it with external magnets to deliver faster to certain parts or cells of the body. But that would never explain metallic objects sticking to any part of the body. Natural oils and friction do explain that.

I don't know much about the technology, but there are way too many videos of people demonstrating the magnetic attraction with clearly strong movement between the attracted option and the body for this to be all 'mistakes' to me. I don't know what exactly is going on here. At first I thought maybe it was just a few weird people looking for a laugh, but I have seen probably 20 videos by now and sometimes the objects clearly jump from the person's hand onto the part of the body where it gets stuck. I've also seen a guy with a stud finder that kept buzzing when he put it on his injection site. There are different explanations, yes. I remain open.

Like I already mentioned in another post comments a few days ago, I also try and stay open and therefore I started asking all the people that I knew were vaccinated if they were magnetic and I even tested myself for a few of them. And not a single one was magnetic. I was almost disappointed.
Even that nurse testifying in Ohio completely failed her demonstration and could not get a key and a bobby pin to stick to her skin

I fully accept that this could all be explained eventually without any magnetic component in the vaccines. I will keep my eye out for the longer video I saw recently.

For sure, I will keep asking vaccinated people. If I can find just one, I'm going to test everything I can on their arm 😉

The very fact that the object jumps is a strong indication that it is most likely fake. The force needed to attract the object (particularly simple metallic objects not generating their own field) so strongly through skin and human tissue would require a significant magnetic field, only possible with way more magnetic material that can be contained in the vaccine dose, which is less than a milliliter.

i don't have the answers, i just know what i saw and don't have an explanation for it. i wish i could find the video. the metallic object was attracted with a similar strength to how i see matal move towards fairly strong magnets, yes.
either it's a weird trick or the person has something metalling in their arm at precisely the injection point or there is something up with the vaccines that we don't understand.

The stud finder video is a perfect example of misleading, it doesn't prove at all what the guy says. Electronic stud finders like the one in the video, rely on density variations to find studs. So, in this guy's case, when it buzzes, it's not because it finds something magnetic, only because the density is different, it could be muscle or bone. You can get the exact same type of buzzing on the other arm (not the injected one), or other parts of the body.

I don't know about the stud finder in the video but plenty of them can detect metal. E.g.
https://www.amazon.com/Stud-Finder-Sensor-Wall-Scanner/dp/B07F6RZM43/ref=asc_df_B07F6RZM43

Of course, but the main detection is still based on the density variations. The additional features like metal detection are calibrated to detect objects similar to nails, small but still much bigger than what can go through a needle. Anyways, like I said, I will keep my eyes open.

If the vaccines contains something that is magnetic then it's fair to say that it operates in a new way that most of us don't have experience of. You are right that I don't have enough knowledge of how this all works to really know either way at this point.

Thanks for the link! Magnetofection has been tested with a malaria vaccine and other experiments. Where is the indication that they are using this in the anti-COVID-19 injections? I seem to recall a doctor saying the SPIONs were in an early diagram in a document on one of these products, that has since been revised. Do you have that link?