STEMsocial distilled - a special James Webb edition (without any James Webb post to discuss)

in StemSocial6 months ago

Greetings Earthlings... and anyone/thing else that happens to come across this post. [We don't discriminate here.]

Today is the day we have all anticipated, the 20th day of the James Webb Telescops's successful launch to L2!

And what better way to celebrate such an auspicious and totally not random landmark in time than with another episode of STEMsocial distilled by @mobbs this week, where we scrutinise and idolise the authors of such prestige and, in some cases, notoriety as to make one feel insignificant in the 1m2 space we inhabit daily. [the 'm' stands for 'meaningless-by-comparison'.]

Today, alongside some lesser-known but no less valuable users, we have an enriching list of battle-hardened regulars of STEMsocial content, the kind of content you can set your watch to.

New or old, it seems these users are all ready to provide a wealth of knowledge and inspiration to the world, paving the way to a better - and more accessible - society of enlightenment. So let's cut the Cyprinus carpio and get on with the show!


Our top choices


Ground Nesting: My Collage for LMAC #107, and the Black Harrier of South Africa

Ok I really wanted to start off with this one because @agmoore has a real talent for drawing you into easily digestible, but often deeply intellectual bodies of work with a thick coating of personality.

This post is actually even more desirable for me as it's quite distant from a purely academic endeavour, but instead a work of art which then inspired a look into ground-nesting animals, such as the black harrier. It's a beautiful way to connect art to science, and the collage image itself is quite fantastical too!

How to Kill Your Musical Instrument (Sound Series Pt 1)

The next work of pure brilliance is by... ME, @mobbs! Because it's been a very long time since I've written something relating to STEM.

In this first part of a multi-part series, I take a look into the physical properties of sound and music, specifically 'Timbre'. You will get to learn how to completely destroy the sound of any musical instrument or other noises in the world, simply by cutting out 'overtones' from the soundwaves they produce. This act will sterilize the richness of a violin, the quirkiness of a clarinet, the warmth of a human voice, and any other characteristic that makes an instrument remotely identifiable. This post is the great equaliser of music.

If you don't believe me, see if you can spot the difference between 6 different instruments. I'd bet money you can't.

Conference Participation -- The Considerate Way

This post by @michelmake is a really nice insight to the working life of a scientist, and how things have changed in the world of a pandemic. Looking in hindsight, it seems clear that things may change permanently - for the better?

@michelmake directs us to an open study of rather shocking statistics on just how much damage we have been doing over the decades going to in-person conferences all around the world.

Check it out, and rethink your life choices in the process! (Especially If you're a major world traveller)

Neural Networks & Deep Learning: A.I in Biology

Two for the Price of one! This post is a continuation of a previous post, so you can start off here if you want the full story - no additional fees!

@mengene looks into the potential powers of AI technology in the context of biology, where it may even advance the fight against cancer, COVID-19, and even hazardous waste! These things seem so contrasting by themselves, which all the more highlights the grand scope of AI's potential in this field.

This second part highlights how AI technology such as RoseTTAFold, with the help of its neural networks, can rapidly increase the speed and accuracy of detection and identification in protein folding research by orders of magnitude. It's really amazing how much we can get done now with the help of evolving tech. Get all the details here!

Malaria is to Africa what COVID19 is to the rest of the world

This final post may be last but certainly not least, as it hits home a very important topic that needs more discussion in a world obsessed with CoViD-19. The truth is, other things are going on too that need attention! @gentleshaid, our most prized member of the STEMsocial team, gives us a true bite of reality from Africa, where CoVid, despite predictions, never really took off when compared to the rest of the world.

Instead, Malaria thrives, in shocking numbers. Even more importantly to me, it highlights how, even when there is proper treatment, distribution and equality of resources can render any efforts practically useless. Read on here for a new perspective!


All rewards earned on the distilled posts are used to fund the STEMsocial project functioning and activities. The author of the distilled, who may be any STEMsocial member depending on the week, gets 30% of the rewards of this post). If you like what we do, please consider joining our community on HIVE and delegating to the @stemsocial account (85% of the curation rewards are returned), or trailing it.

Thanks a lot to all STEMsocial authors of the week for their very nice contributions to our community. For those who do not know what STEMsocial is, please take a look here, or pass by Discord or the Openhive Chat.

See you next time!

PS: Note that from now on, all STEMsocial communications will be made from the @stemsocial account, and not the @steemstem account anymore (that will of course still be used to vote).

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It's an honor to get mentioned in this blogpost. Thanks for the pick @mobbs and the @stemsocial team. I look forward to the next picks. We've got awesome minds here on Hive.

We definitely have great minds and writers around us! Thanks for your contributions!

Beautiful written. Love reading anything from @Mobbs. Tagging me as the most prized member stemsocial is quite flattering, but appreciated.

We are getting really good posts nowadays. Kudos to everyone.

You are our most prized member, so that the tag is well deserved! :)

Thank you, Prof. I genuinely appreciate the compliment and will try my possible to remain steadfast for the growth of stemsocial. Everyone is important as far as I'm concerned.

Yeah, you're very prolific, you've worked so hard. Congrats.

... as far as we are concerned :)

We could write some code to check it, if we haven't, but at least it is morally true.

Love reading anything from @Mobbs

They don't call me 'dream weaver' for nothing =D

Thank you very much for highlighting my post @mobbs.

Stemsocial (in its earlier incarnation) was one of the anchors that held me to the platform when I first started. Although I'm not formally trained in science, I felt a natural affinity for the community and was treated kindly in my early days. Then, what you say in your comments touches on one of my core principles: there is no division between art and science. Inspiration and intuition are essential in both and lead to insight. You demonstrate this in music. @lemouth demonstrates it when he leads us through the mysteries of the universe.

It's great to see Distilled back on a regular basis. I know it takes work, but I think the publication gives cohesion to the community. Thanks for doing the work this week.

You and I are similar in that way, so I guess we have that natural connection, a strong inclination and passion for the sciences and the arts. We are the most important ones! We bring a bit of soul to the understanding of the universe =D

I think the publication gives cohesion

Good point, and a useful thing to look back on to establish what we are, as the project evolves

We are the most important ones!

Maybe you. I am too much of a dilettante :) You are a specialist. But you are correct. I am drawn to science and to art, any kind of art.

I'm looking forward to your music series. Many years ago I was in a high school orchestra, but I never learned anything about music theory, or the science of music. Your series will be an adventure for me.

Have a great weekend (and say hello to your cat--I have a soft spot for every cat in the world).

Science and arts are definitely both important. You may like this place (arts @ CERN). I remember having enjoyed resident artists at the time I was regularly visiting CERN. That sounds so long ago... ;)

That is wonderful! I am going to share the site with @shaka. I think he'd really like it.
Thank you!

Thanks a lot for these nice words.

I agree that it is really cool to see the distilled back, both because our community members like it and write comments to it, and because we now have a full team of distilled writers (@gentleshaid, @eniolw, @mobbs and myself). This definitely helps in keeping it regular!

Cheers, and have a nice week-end!

PS: We would obviously be happy to welcome anyone into our team of distilled writers!

Hello @lemouth,
I've been thinking of you as news of the Webb telescope broke. It's all very exciting.

I am looking forward to Monday and my next 'lesson'. When I read news now about the skies, or about physics, my attention is drawn. Isn't that wonderful, the effect you have had?

Writing for me comes relatively easily (actually easier for me to write than to talk). However the science does not come so easily. It is always new terrain, new vocabulary to be mastered, so reading the articles takes much longer than you might expect. However, when I am done, I retain a good deal of what I've read because of the focus.

I would volunteer to help write Distilled, but most of the science is an uphill endeavor. It would take so long to sort through the articles that I would have no time for anything else. This is especially true because I am afflicted with a strong sense of responsibility.

I love this community. Anything I can do to support it, to promote it, I will. It is an honor to be part of this. I think the future for StemSocial is really bright.

Have a great weekend with your family. Warm regards,

 5 months ago (edited)

I've been thinking of you as news of the Webb telescope broke. It's all very exciting.
I am looking forward to Monday and my next 'lesson'. When I read news now about the skies, or about physics, my attention is drawn. Isn't that wonderful, the effect you have had?

The James Webb telescope indeed opens a lot for the future. I am looking forward to the first results in a few months/years, and I may eventually blog about (even if this is not too related to my work).

As usual, thanks for the nice words!

Writing for me comes relatively easily (actually easier for me to write than to talk). However the science does not come so easily. It is always new terrain, new vocabulary to be mastered, so reading the articles takes much longer than you might expect. However, when I am done, I retain a good deal of what I've read because of the focus.

I really enjoy your texts too, as they touch in a passionate way topics I would not even consider myself (which is why I try to read them all, sometimes a bit later than when you released them). It is a great pleasure to have you with us since the beginning (I don't remember exactly when you joined; This was in the early days, wasn't it?).

On my side, I lie at the opposite edge as you do. I talk much more easily than I write. I actually find it much simpler to simplify the topics about which I want to share with spoken words than with written ones. For that reason, every single piece of feedback is always appreciated (to basically allow to conclude about an accomplished mission or not).

I would volunteer to help write Distilled, but most of the science is an uphill endeavor. It would take so long to sort through the articles that I would have no time for anything else. This is especially true because I am afflicted with a strong sense of responsibility.

If you want to contribute to the editing of the distilled, you are welcome to join the team. What I usually do is to extract a list with the eligible posts (that's about 10 posts per week) and the author of the distilled then makes their choice among them. If this is fine for you, we will add you to the team and will allocate you the first slot in February. Please let me know.

Thank you, my friend. To go back to may early association with STEMsocial (in that other universe), when I was starting out in 2018 and had no VP, no reputation, from time to time this community would come by and give me a nice vote and a nice comment. It was the most encouraging thing. Appreciation for my hard work just because the community thought it had value. That doesn't happen everywhere and it gave me the incentive (and courage) to take on difficult subjects. I'll always be grateful for that. What an adventure it has been.

As for editing Distilled, I am honored that you think I can, but really, I don't feel up to it. I will obsess and worry and it will really be difficult. That is my personality.

I am very loyal to the community and will do everything I can to promote and support it. STEMsocial is a gem. I'm on the team, even if I am not officially on the team.

Thanks for this honest answer. This is fine with me of course, and we will have fun with the upcoming (not so) secret event ;)

@stemsocial, thanks for noticing and giving this boost in exposure! Really appreciate it :-)

The pleasure was for us :)

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Nice review!
I am also following closely the developments on the James Webb.

I hope your oxygen doesn't run out

@Mobbs is showing off his superscript skills.

Actually, @mobbs used his subscript skills and I changed it to superscripts when posting ;) They appear nicer, IMO.

I knew he couldn't've done it by himself!

rofl!