What Is the Role of Marine Viruses in our Environment?

in StemSociallast month

sea-water-ocean-diving-underwater-biology-957263-pxhere.com.jpg

from PxHere

For more than two decades, marine researchers have been reporting the discovery of virus particles in saltwater. This discovery was initially surprising, but virus particles have continued to be discovered in seawater. Cyanobacteria, for example, are a kind of prokaryotic and eukaryotic protist producer that can be found in practically all marine food chains and is responsible for the production of cyanobacteria. Microorganisms such as phytoplankton, sometimes known as microscopic plants, are the world's most important carbon fixers and oxygen producers, responsible for eliminating carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. A tremendous amount of virus particles were detected in seawater, which resulted in several issues being experienced by researchers. Can viruses that infect phytoplankton colonies keep control over the number of organisms that they infect and infect? What influence viruses have on the carbon and oxygen cycles in food chains can be determined, but how do you go about determining that? It remains to be seen if scientists will be able to include marine viruses in their models of ocean ecosystems. The inhalation or ingestion of any of these viruses by humans may provide a risk of infection.

Viruses found in the water play a crucial part in this process.
Since the 1990s, researchers have made major strides forward in their understanding of marine viral pathogenesis. Among others who have done a study on marine viruses in the water is Lita Proctor of the University of California, Los Angeles. After their host cells have perished, according to Proctor's observations, marine viruses are only discovered to float freely after they have died. The fact that Proctor found this while utilizing electron microscopy to support his thesis is noteworthy.

Researchers from the Department of Marine Biology at the University of British Columbia and its colleagues have discovered the exact types of marine viruses that exist, as well as the jobs that these viruses perform. Suttle employed immunoglobulins that were tagged with fluorescent dyes to identify certain viruses and the hosts that they infected to develop a better understanding of how viruses spread. As Suttle points out, there are several distinct forms of marine viruses that may infect phytoplankton and cause them to cease photosynthesis. He made an effort to remove particular types of viruses from their hosts out of concern for the health of the hosts in which they lived. It was just the phytoplankton that had ceased growing, according to Suttle, and this was due to a lack of nutrients.

Upon the death of a host-virus, nutrients that were essential for the survival of other species were released. The findings of Suttle's research indicate that viruses are responsible for the mortality of around 20 percent of all phytoplankton species at any one moment. Following Suttle's studies, marine viruses have a significant impact on the carbon cycle, in addition to other areas of ecological interaction and interaction.

Marine Viruses That Are Transmissible to Humans is a current research project.
With the use of molecular genetics technology, scientists have been able to identify viruses that have been connected to human illness in the rivers around numerous coastal places. The presence of a range of potentially harmful viruses in sewage that is dumped into the ocean is a possibility. As of right now, it has been demonstrated that saltwater contains poliovirus, hepatitis A virus, and maybe HIV. Researchers say it is still up in the air whether or not these submerged viruses will have an impact on swimming enthusiasts.

Even though research on marine viruses is still in its infancy, the relevance of these viruses cannot be overstated. In part, because only 2% of phytoplankton can be cultured at this time, research into marine viruses is more challenging.


References

https://www.nature.com/articles/nrmicro1750
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marine_viruses
• Modern Biology byJohn H. Postlethwait
Janet L. Hopson, ISBN 0-03-065178
https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/earth-and-planetary-sciences/marine-virus
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/10376593/

5ZJ4Z52ZRyQfNkCWFfXsATSsPtfkBwT3a5k8RVinr67352ma7hvuz3ukqfc9QNDFmUZFxS2WRkQc5mBj8v4V6pjH1YqaaGMkAhBgihoziYUTrcXp6W8tQZ88jE6Cru...77UpiHaK2B9QnbBwQyo4dhorn71fKBcVP7UcFZRv64yP3G8UED7or1pBTqGzGLuDMZvB7ji336hdsMUs1QUT1bY5MRHFbuTU9JvxH23LgQQbJG36Wtr4Qa99Qa.png

Who Am I?

I am just a beginner who lives in the Western Hemisphere of Africa with his parents. My name is James but you can notify me with @churchangel, here.😂 Being the first child, My parents, Mr. and Mrs. Onu who are just wonderful And hardworking couples. My father is an electrical engineer while my mother is a trader. They always work collaboratively just to make sure that their children don't lack the necessities. I graduated from high school in the year 2018. And My favorite subjects are physics chemistry and biology. I am going to enter the university because my goal is to study these subjects in the future and to become a respected professional in one of the fields. Between, I am an accomplished computer hardware technician. After I obtained my SSCE certificate, I took interest in learning more about computer hardware and its maintenance. I am obsessed with all tech-related and I enjoy using my skill to contribute to the exciting technological advances. I'd spend my free time learning about programming and also assisting people on how to fix any problem related to Tech! 💞*********🌹❤️Special thanks to my supporters❤️🌹********💞 At this very moment, I am unable to find a suitable words to express my gratitude over all your supports. You guys generosity never ceases to amaze me. This space has become a place of fun for me. All because of colleagues like you. Thanks for being there for me. I will always appreciate all your kindness and supports towards me and my family💕.
Sort:  

What an interesting reading. Thanks for sharing it. I am not surprised about everything that can be found in water, especially when we account, as you said, to the fact that sewer waters are just thrown into the oceans...

With the use of molecular genetics technology, scientists have been able to identify viruses that have been connected to human illness in the rivers around numerous coastal places. The presence of a range of potentially harmful viruses in sewage that is dumped into the ocean is a possibility. As of right now, it has been demonstrated that saltwater contains poliovirus, hepatitis A virus, and maybe HIV. Researchers say it is still up in the air whether or not these submerged viruses will have an impact on swimming enthusiasts.

Dear @jsalvage, Do you think marine viruses were created because of human-made pollutants?

Even though research on marine viruses is still in its infancy, the relevance of these viruses cannot be overstated. In part, because only 2% of phytoplankton can be cultured at this time, research into marine viruses is more challenging.

Regarding the role of marine viruses, I came to this conclusion: If marine viruses destroy phytoplankton, perhaps 80% of life on Earth would disappear.
Marine virus will make the beginning of the end of the world.😱

Thanks for your contribution to the STEMsocial community. Feel free to join us on discord to get to know the rest of us!

Please consider delegating to the @stemsocial account (80% of the curation rewards are returned).

Please consider including @stemsocial as a beneficiary to get a stronger support. 
 

Good information @jsalvage we invite you to suscribe to the Aquatic Sentinels community! maybe you can share information like this here, you're welcome!😄🐬

Hive Foot 2.png

Thank you for the invitation. I will publish more of such articles there!!