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RE: What are you buying?

in LeoFinance3 months ago

Believe it or not, all that I can remember of 1969 is Woodstock.
You are correct as all infrastructure has to start somewhere and at my age I have seen many progressive changes. During the days of the Swiss handmade watches, my mom used to say that one day we would drop our broken watches into the dustbin.
Internet and the web was no exeption and even now it continues to improve, especially with the hardware. Same with the web.
Check this out!
computers_1969.jpg

[Source](https://www.slideserve.com/geraldine-salinas/cpsc-441-computer-communications

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Wasn't there also the moon landing?

During the days of the Swiss handmade watches, my mom used to say that one day we would drop our broken watches into the dustbin.

Drop everything in the bin these days, even if it isn't broken - just because a new model is available.

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Drop everything in the bin these days, even if it isn't broken - just because a new model is available.

Yes, you are right, but in those years we didn't have TV so it was not a big thing in our lives.
Strangely I have now reverted back to those years as we got rid of our TV two years ago.

Drop everything in the bin these days, even if it isn't broken - just because a new model is available.

Imagine that, "drop everything into the bin"

I bought the Canon Powershot SX60HS in 2017 for it's abilities to get the moon with full clear shots.
Since then it has become my constant companion. Broke down once and had the colour thingymagingy changed at great cost due to taking direct pictures of the sun.

Now it's on it's last legs, as the zoom carraige system is shot and they have replaced the SX60HS model with a SX70HS model, which is much more compact.
Spares for the SX60 has been discontinued, but I still use it every day and will continue until it dies.

Cameras are a money sink, but they also bring a lot of joy as well as on Hive, the potential to support some income. The challenge with the new ones is that digital always breaks sooner than mechanical, but it is a tradeoff for quality and versatility. What is going to be interesting in the future, is the number of cars that become disposable because of all of their little screens not working, making them somewhat undrivable considering that is where a lot of the settings are done, and only there. Hard to have a classic car in 30 years, based on a car today.

I think new job opportunities await in the EL car business.
Today some mechanics concentrate on the niche mechanical side of repairing and replacing car boosters and they should rather start to learn how to replace the little screens in the new cars.
The old is mechanical and the new is digital.