A little more robotic

in PowerHouseCreatives3 months ago

OI000278 1.jpg

I should sleep, but I don't really want to sleep and I have some kind of nervous energy. Normally I will write at these times as it tends to calm me (which is what I am doing now), but earlier I decided to try digital painting instead - something I have never done before to any degree and perhaps after my first attempt, probably shouldn't do again.

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Now you know why I used the bee image as the entry picture instead of this monstrosity :)

I have an ancient Wacom tablet I was given a million years ago that I haven't used for an eternity and what I did use it for previously was simple vector graphics. I have never been much of a painter at the best of times, color was never my thing and I can't remember the last time I picked up a pencil to draw with intent - but I can see why many people enjoy the digital painting process as it has a low barrier to entry. Don't get me wrong, there is plenty of skill and creativity that can be applied, but large areas can be covered quickly and, mistakes can be erased or added in removable layers (this had 2 layers - I don't know how to use them properly). Because of the potential to "redo", it takes a lot of the fear out of it, meaning that perhaps people will attempt for a finish they might not be game to try if they has spent the last 100 hours getting a painting up to that point.

While the opportunity to experiment further is there, I also think that it can mean that a lot of the skill doesn't get developed. I liken it to the amount of photographers who reel off shot after shot for the perfect image, as the cost to do so is close enough to zero that it doesn't matter. I think it would be different if people had to actually print their photos at a lab with significant cost, as they would be far more sparing in clicks.

The lower barrier of entry is great for inclusion, but it doesn't encourage skill development to a high degree as it becomes an "anyone can do it" process and puts a lot of noise into the space. Again, this isn't criticism of artists digital or otherwise, but I think part of what makes art artistic, is the process behind the result, the development of an idea through to the finish - and that includes developing the skillset to achieve the desired results.

Inclusion is a double edged sword as while it is great to have everyone involved, we also value the scarcity of skill and once the results of a skill are obtainable easily, the skill itself is devalued. Again, in photography we see this in the reliance on software and filters to do the job on site and then post processing to clean up and add all kinds of tweaks to polish the image. While this might not be a bad thing, it does change the skills required for the result, with evermore reliance on external tools than personal knowhow and practical ability.

The problem perhaps is that we as the audience prefer the technology aided result over the one where a skilled human with minimal tools did a fantastic job. We love the crispness of the computer aided imagery, we love the level of detail possible through a filter that may be impossible with a hand and brush. What is the point of spending hundreds of hours completing one painting when the audience prefers to share one similar that took only a handful and achieved a finer result?

Perhaps that this lowering of barriers for inclusion is a good thing as more can participate and maybe it is just the change in what we value, but I do feel that we are losing something fundamental to our humanness when we take away the path to being skilled. Most of us dream to have skills available like in the Matrix, where we are only a download away from being able to fly a helicopter or speak a foreign language - but where does the value come from then, where is the competitive advantage when everyone can do the same, what is the point of trying to learn anything when it isn't necessary?

I think that the more we remove the learning curve to obtaining a skill, the more robotic we become, the more homogeneous and, the lower the chance for random events and development. What happens when we all have the same teacher and receive the same lessons in a world where practice and personal development of skill to learn is discouraged through lack of incentive to do so?

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What happens when we are reliant on the release of the next update in order to function? With each new feature we gain, we should think about what part of us we are going to lose through disuse.

I am not good at many things, but I am still learning.

Taraz
[ Gen1: Hive ]

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There does seem to be a lot of people that think because they can take a hundred pictures, use the tools to make it better believe they are on a par with the professionals. I sort of feel sorry for those people. I know I will never be a scottsshots or marktruangel or axman or derangedvisions or jarvie (I probably screwed some of the names up but I'm sure you know the pro's I speak of), that is why I do not even pretend. Photography is a skill, I can look at and see the difference in my photo's and those of the real amateurs seeking to improve and the pro's looking for different techniques from colleagues.

It seems to be the same in the digital art field, there are the equivalent of the backyard hobby photographer, amateur, and pro levels, I do see people sometimes asking why that person got more rewards, and their work is ignored. While the tools and simplicity may make it easier, they do not make you a professional. it takes time, learning the skill set, and then a lot of practice putting those skills to use.

Inclusiveness is not a right nor a privilege, when a person is included in or as a part of a club/group/professional society, it should be because they have put the time and the effort into being recognized as a peer. Short-cuts are not going to get a person recognized.

I think at times we need a return to the exclusiveness point of view. I know not many will understand that. Honorary Membership/degrees have destroyed the meaning of most Exclusive Clubs, and Higher learning facilities. Why work at being a real member when you can just buy your way in.

Many things have been devalued by buy-ins and Inclusiveness. There are some people that are just better at somethings than others. Just because a person can write or type does not make them an Author. There is a difference between a nice picture and a professional one. Between an okay painting and a masterpiece. Between a blog and Gone with the Wind.

I think a lot of content/creators/producers do not understand the the consumer can distinguish between various levels. I am not sure about:

the audience prefer the technology aided result over the one where a skilled human with minimal tools did a fantastic job

The younger audience perhaps, I am no longer young, I still like the works that were worked on.

While the tools and simplicity may make it easier, they do not make you a professional. it takes time, learning the skill set, and then a lot of practice putting those skills to use.

Very few of the artists/photogs (even the good ones) will be able to make a living from it. I like that on Hive that here everyone can pretty much earn something, some tiny recognition of their attempt. Very few will ever make it significant on or off Hive. Being envious of others here or anywhere is silly, regardless of what they produce.

it should be because they have put the time and the effort into being recognized as a peer. Short-cuts are not going to get a person recognized.

I think we have swallowed the "overnight success" line too deeply and we are choking on it. Even basic skills take time to develop and when it comes to public support, the network doesn't come cheaply. I am not talking about "buying friends" as you know, I mean it takes effort to actually build relationships that last.

Community is an investment from every individual.

The younger audience perhaps, I am no longer young, I still like the works that were worked on.

Many people love high-definition, seeing every pore in the skin. They base the quality of a photo on how fine the image is, not what was actually captured. We want slow motion in sports, an unbreakable voice to sing, no mistakes, no degradation in fidelity. While not everyone feels this way, likely most of us in some way do this.

You might enjoy this series. I have only seen one or two of them.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCr_1EbMqDlNaqnQK157-JVw

I'll take a look at some of the vids tomorrow for me, getting late here. As you know, most artist never make a lot of money when they are alive, a few may get some recognition for awhile, but it always seems short lived. I am sure the art patrons know who is in vogue today, who is yesterdays old news, and who might be up and coming, but as just a mere mortal, it is hard to find art that I like.

Andy Warhol was supposed to have been an in vogue real artist the darling of the art community, for me, I really did not like his art. I preferred Frank Frazetta and Escher.

There are people on Hive who's art I and photography I do like. One of the benefits that I see for artist and photographers is they can build a good following and get rewarded. It takes time, but the good art/photo's are going to shine and people will follow.

I wish people could see beyond looking for a single or couple of whale supporters for their work, and just concentrate on doing what they are good at and try to build a support base of ordinary small accounts, they would be better off. There really is room for all levels of skill on Hive, and there are communities to support the various levels, but the instant gratification of suddenly being seen by one big whale vote, and then no follow up the instant stardom fades and the * "overnight success"* becomes nothing but a one night stand.

I wish people could see beyond looking for a single or couple of whale supporters for their work, and just concentrate on doing what they are good at and try to build a support base of ordinary small accounts, they would be better off

What they don't seem to realize is that doing it this way means that they are also supporting those smaller accounts to grow, by producing content that they like. In time, those small accounts become much larger and there will be many, many more of them.

The one night stand crowd don't survive anywhere for long.

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Its the consolation trophy mentality, and it wont end well, I agree with you.

That is a great essay. How much, exactly, is lost if we remove the learning curve?
A question for philosophers, gets down to definitions of good and bad.

I've never been "good" at photography. But I can now take the many many shots I need to get the right angle, the right distance, the right light, then crop it just so, jimmy the color level just a tad, and end up with a photo that is pretty darn good! I feel like a pro! But the best photographers SEE differently. There is not yet a device that can do that.

did you see this @tarazkp? no amateur can do this, or even imagine trying to do it, we can not imagine the photo to go for it in the first place.
https://peakd.com/hive-114105/@manoldonchev/a-horse-in-a-pan

I did see it ... but with enough shots... ;D

Manold is great.

But I could not even imagine trying for that shot. Manold knew it was there, somewhere, somehow. Thank goodness.

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It is the "seeing" that many miss and the positioning oneself before the shot, in anticipation, settings at the ready or, ready to be adjusted on the fly. Pros have the experience to predict. We can all have some fun though :)

True skills take a lot of blood sweat a tears to perfect. But "short cut" is the new way and you can ask any of the watch creators what they think about the current throw away watches. Mass produced with no love and skill.

Soon we may see the modern day digital "Mona Lisa" selling for millions lol.

I still take photos in the old style and publish my photos unedited and even if edited stuff looks more glamerous than mine, it does not faze me at all.

What does faze me is if I have to show a "qualified" artisan how to do his job properly. True skills are really slowly but surely dissapearing.

But then again the new inventions make things so much easier and that digital drawing of yours looks better than a few that I have seen here. Maybe we have a new top selling artist in the Hive family.

I cannot draw to save my life and at least you tried lol.

Soon we may see the modern day digital "Mona Lisa" selling for millions lol.

It probably already happens.

What does faze me is if I have to show a "qualified" artisan how to do his job properly. True skills are really slowly but surely dissapearing.

This is really common these days, but there are new standards" and there is no point in being highly skilled, if only getting paid to reach a low bar.

I should test it again. I quite enjoy drawing and maybe the low investment in effort is suitable for my style :D

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Agreed!
The new standards will make the old mastercraftsmen turn in their graves my friend.

"low investment in effort"
If you can do it for free why not. You already have the equipment, so there's no layout for easles, brushes and such and I am sure the old tablet will not run out of paint hahaha

There has already been too much ENGAGE today.

Different people may have different perception of art. The above looks like oil painting even though you mentioned that it was digital painting. Art appreciation is also subjective to individual preference. The digital art above looks like abstract art and it can be appreciate so it was better than you thought. We may often be more critical to ourselves so let others decide how much they like your art! It is definitely a good attempt!

!tip

There is the eye of the beholder perspective, but it seems that the eye is lowering the threshold of what is good these days - also what is innovative.

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There has already been too much ENGAGE today.

Why shouldn't you do it again? Were you immediately good with a pencil when you decided to pick that up? :D

and don't try to give me any lip child I've seen your pencil drawings

If it's any consolation I started off with two layers, one for lineart and one for colour. Then it became three, lineart, flats and shading. Now that's true for my sketchies and the bigger works, think one of my last ones ended up around a hundred (but I'm not sure how accurate it is as Krita keeps incrementing layer numbers by 1 even if you delete one) and I'm not convinced I'm using them "correctly" either.

Otherwise this kind of reads a lot like ye olde "the computer is doing it all for you", are we STILL not past that it's been over a decade for me now XD

but where does the value come from then, where is the competitive advantage when everyone can do the same, what is the point of trying to learn anything when it isn't necessary?

Because it's fun! :D

When I picked up a pencil for the first time - it was beautiful...

...probably not.

I didn't even have a line layer :D I had colour on both - it was awkward.

It is fun for sure - but people (we see this here) want to be paid for their fun.

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There has already been too much ENGAGE today.

Lol I've seen worse, don't even rate it bad at all.

While this might not be a bad thing, it does change the skills required for the result, with evermore reliance on external tools than personal knowhow and practical ability

I don't quite see this as a bad thing. Indeed if like in the Matrix, we can each easily have access to ubiquitous knowledge, I feel it'll spur creativity more, not stifle it.

Yeah the barriers to entry becomes lower, and if I were a talented craftsman seeing by field being 'abused' I'd probably be pissed, still I just don't see how more people being able to perform my job can be a bad thing

I am not sure it will add creativity for most (though most don't flex their own now) as it will be relying on the products of others. Not too long ago, to be a computer nerd required programming skills, practical build skills and the like - now it is what you can buy and use.

When it comes to skills, most will be replaced in time, however the speed of replacement is increasing.

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It doesn't look bad for a first try. I think it is a completely different medium and yes, the idea that you can erase and start back takes some pressure off your shoulders. I am more of a traditional kind of artist, but I promised myself I must try digital too. I wonder about the creative possibilities

It was fun and I might try a bit more as I think I could get a "half decent" result one day. I do however like to have art on my walls and there is nothing like a real painting. I think that growing up, I was spoiled in this regard.

Lucky you! I agree with this, I prefer the real deal too.

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Very successful for the first try.

I think I will try to go pro next week ;D

I have no doubt about it :)

The fact that you are constantly learning and makes you the best!!!

Not the best - but I have fun :)

That's a pretty good job you did there, considering that you don't do this often. :)

I don't know, I kinda like sitting on my chair for 4 hours, and creating something with my own hands. The work may be a imperfect, but the satisfaction after the 4 hours of patience, cannot be bought with anything in the world for me. Though, I am open to new skills and materials, it's just that I haven't tried em yet. :D

For me, it is the writing time where I feel the sense of flow these days, but I used to get it from drawing with a pencil back in the day. I don't think I have ever finished a drawing in my life though - "unfinished" is my style.

If I had more time and money, I would experiment more with materials. I have always wanted to try oils.

Writing, too actually, does calm me down, but I haven't gone deeply inside yet.

Dang! oils are pretty intimidating to me. lol!

Lol...your first attempt wasn't bad at all. I haven't tried digital painting before but i am a graphics designer. And i can tell there was creativity on that work. But as u pointed out learning never ends and with mistakes we learn and get better. I suggest you show it to a digital painter he might have one or two advices for you but you might be shock at the amount of credits he may give you

I have high standards for "not bad" when it comes to my own work. I am far more forgiving on others. With practice I think I could get the hang of it and it would have been far easier if I kept it B&W, but whu not experient a bit - digital space is close to free and plentiful :)

Do you have work of yours on chain?

No...not yet. I am still looking to do that, i don't really where to start from

Communities.

Artists (which is why I didn't post there :D ):
https://peakd.com/c/hive-156509/trending

Creatives of many kinds
https://peakd.com/c/hive-114105/trending

There are more

Ok....thanks very much for the direction. I really appreciate

I am still new in the community

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If you don't mind...and maybe it was said but I missed it...but, what software did you use? I also have a cheap drawing tablet and have tried Krita. It seems respected and powerful but intimidates rookies like me.

This was Krita. I DL'd it last night and this was what I got out of it in about 30 minutes. I didn't really give it all of my effort in that time, it was more just to get a feel of it and the tablet.

Thanks. Your painting looks good by the way, especially in only 30 minutes. I've got to get back to trying things out on Krita. I've really only done one semi-painting using it...an image from 9/11/2001. And now that I think of it, that might make a decent post. You just gave me an idea!

:)

Most of us dream to have skills available like in the Matrix, where we are only a download away from being able to fly a helicopter or speak a foreign language

Download Food.jpg

what is the point of trying to learn anything when it isn't necessary?

Oh! and now just wait until 3D printers starts to be more advanced, sophisticated, cheap, popular and mainstream. };)

I send a message to my wife and she can bring me something from the kitchen now.

Lucky you that are married. :p :D

Asi es el aprender no ocupa lugar, pero la realidad es que nunca dejamos de aprender, el hecho de vivir ya es un aprendisaje, gracias por compartir.

You'll need these drawing skills for the #weekend-engagement topic this week. No entry from you will go badly for you. Trust me. Lol.

I am going to be in it to win it

Lol...Well, I'm sure your picture won't be worse than mine.

I dont know why but i see bumble bee in the picture. Very cute

🎁 Hi @tarazkp! You have received 0.1 HIVE tip from @fun2learn!

Sending tips with @tipU - how to guide.

"The lower barrier of entry is great for inclusion, but it doesn't encourage skill development to a high degree as it becomes an "anyone can do it" process and puts a lot of noise into the space."

"Inclusion is a double edged sword as while it is great to have everyone involved, we also value the scarcity of skill and once the results of a skill are obtainable easily, the skill itself is devalued"

OMG, golden

ReHived

Maybe it is a good thing that it becomes more inclusive as AI and automation take more and more of the paid jobs available. Perhaps one day, all we can be is crappy artists with low skill in comparison to the supercomputers that do the task a million times faster with precision and thought no human can ever have.