Whatever Happened to all the "Invisible Things" We Saw as Kids?

in Silver Bloggers3 months ago

When I was young, I was often described as "having an active imagination."

Part of that statement is definitely true, although I'd submit that now — as an adult in my 60's — I still have an active imagination.

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It has long interested me how — as kids — a lot of us would "see things" that we felt absolutely certain we'd seen, and yet the adults around us would typically dismiss such things as "nonsense" and us "seeing things."

Well, damn right, I was "seeing things."

Now, I'd be more inclined to agree with consensus perception if "seeing things" was a weird rarity; something that happened to 1-in-1000 kids.

But that's where we have a problem. So many people I know as a kid "saw" this thing or the other, and there was often remarkable overlap as to what we saw, even if we had not talked or conferred, previously.

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It reminds me a bit of some of the conversations I have had with @cosmictriage over the years. The question about people who have "visions" of something isn't so much of whether or not they are "nuts," but how come they are all — again, without conferring with each other — having the same visions, in a world where your imagination can build literally millions of different imaginary things.

Mass psychosis? Or are we — quite literally"missing" something... something that's actually right in front of our faces, but we lack the tools/perception/instruments to detect it?

There are ways in which "scientific methodology" has perhaps made us too rigorous, at least in the sense that we — as a culture — seem to be growing less and less willing to at least explore rather off the wall theories... for fear they won't stand up to scientific scrutiny.

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Maybe I'm just getting cynical in my old age... but isn't "science" without a sense of adventure and inquiry rather soulless and dry?

I realize lots of people in this world find a lot of comfort in sticking to the paradigm that "unless I can SEE it and MEASURE it, it doesn't EXIST." But that makes the whole process rather static and unwilling to entertain the possibility that "the science" is really based on the best available theory in the moment, and those moments are constantly changing.

You show your smartphone to even a learned individual in the 18th century, and they would call it — through THEIR lens of perception — "witchcraft" or "magic," but we know perfectly well that it isn't.

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All I'm saying here is that what we may consider "normal" today might as well have been pulled from the realm of "the invisible" and the "supernatural" of the past.

And what's why I am still curious to know what might have happened to the "invisible things" many of us saw, as kids.

Thanks for reading, and have a great weekend!

How about YOU? Did you "see things" when you were a kid? When did you start believing they were "nonsense?" Are you ever curious as to what you really DID experience... not just "an overactive imagination?" Comments, feedback and other interaction is invited and welcomed! Because — after all — SOCIAL content is about interacting, right? Leave a comment — share your experiences — be part of the conversation!

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I have always had vivid (not lucid, per se) dreams, but not seeing things other people can see. I do have a sibling who says she sees things none of us can, even now in adulthood.

I, too, have a family member who sees things the rest of us don't see. Most of what she sees is very unpleasant, but not always. I used to think she was making it up,but she can describe the same thing to several people over a period of time and her story never changes. I've concluded this is a sort of gift that some people have. I sometimes sense when something is "off", but I have never seen what I am sensing.

Hello! Interesting read.

Well, shared delusional disorder does exist. That definitely has to do with some strange experiences that some people have, but most of the time I don't think the experience is due to a syndrome.

I think the easiest explanation for many of those "visions" is a perceptual error combined with a very suggestive mind and sometimes a bit of intoxication. There are many natural phenomena that people mistakenly attribute to supernatural things, but that is due to their prior beliefs, their biases.

On the other hand, I'm afraid ESP has long since been disproved by science, although every now and then, due to incredible methodological errors and a lot of luck, there is a false positive that even gets published in a journal, only to be disproved shortly thereafter because it fails replication tests.

There was also a contest offering a million dollars to whoever would demonstrate ESP under proper observational conditions. Many psychics and such people showed up, but no one was even able to pass the preliminary tests.

Now, if someday it is demonstrated that human beings can possess a strange ability, it does not have to be "supernatural". It will just be recognized as something real and natural. For example, there have been many attempts to prove that humans can sense magnetic fields like other animals. If that were true, perhaps it could explain a natural ability that at the moment they call "extrasensory perception".

Well, I've gone on long enough. All this is well documented. I'm sure google will help you if you want to verify the information.

Cheers.