Hubble Space Telescope 30th Anniversary

in #blog2 years ago

I am going to assume that everyone has heard about Hubble Space Telescope, if you didn't you have probably sometimes in your life stumbled upon a picture from hubble at least once in your life, either through tv shows or just googling some meaningless stuff or space pictures.

Anyways, 30 years ago was deployed in space in April 1990. It had problems in the beginning that needed to be fixed, astronauts were sent, and it became operational. Anyways, HST is one of the greatest breakthroughs in astronomy - High up in Low Earth Orbit (about 550km above the ground) it is has a clear view to the vast and dark skies. No clouds, no rain, no humidity - nothing that bothers all the telescopes on Earth.

With a mirror of 2.5m in diameter it produced the best images of space in optical wavelengths - even tho we have younger and new telescopes up to 10m in diameters on Earth.

If that is the case - why don't we send more telescopes to space - Cost, trouble of operating it, etc...

Anyways - Recently HST made it's last deep field survey and published an image called Legacy.

It's successor will be James Webb Space Telescope, a mighty beast with 6.5 mirrors that has a goal to see the very beginning of the Universe (just after the Big Bang).

For 30th anniversary and 2020 ESA has published a calendar with a selection of beautiful photos. Check them out.

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

December

All photos are taken from the site below. You can find more info about the objects, as well as the full- high resolution pre-print calendar file in the link below:

https://www.spacetelescope.org/news/heic2001/?lang


Co-founder of Crowdmind project.
CEO of @Curie.
Curie witness and crowdwitness operator.
If you happen to have some free witness votes, don't be shy to approve these ones, we are ranked as 63rd and 23rd respectively.

Sort:  

Seeing photos from it are always so breathtaking. It really gives a new perspective on just how massive the known universe is and how small we really are.